Tuna RFMO Transshipment Analysis

Tuna RFMO Transshipment Analysis 2019-08-05T09:32:43+00:00

Global Fishing Watch and The Pew Charitable Trusts are working together to improve understanding and management of transshipment at-sea through greater transparency, monitoring and analysis of the activity. 

Current monitoring and regulatory controls over at-sea transshipment are inadequate, as there are few guarantees that all transfers are being reported and observed. These gaps in oversight create opportunities for illicit activities, such as misreporting or non-reporting of catch. These circumstances can also foster conditions that are conducive to transnational crimes such as trafficking in weapons, drugs and people, as well as poor working conditions.

Securing strong oversight of transshipment is critical to protect those who abide by the rules and ensure that others who seek to undermine the health and value of the fishery do not receive an unfair advantage by being able to move or land fish which had been illegally caught.

As part of this collaboration, we are producing a series of reports exploring transshipment activity in the five tuna Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs). The reports are submitted as informational papers for policy makers attending annual tuna Commission meetings and will be posted here as they become available.  

2019 Reports

  1. PDF: Analysis of Possible Transshipment Activity in the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission Convention Area in 2017 through the Use of AIS Data
  2. PDF: A Comparative Analysis of 2017 Reported Carrier Vessel Activity and Transshipments in the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) Convention Area using AIS Data
  3. PDF: A Comparative Analysis of 2017 Reported Transshipment Activity in the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) Convention Area using AIS Data

Tuna RFMOs

What is transshipment?

Transshipment refers to the transfer of fish or other marine wildlife between a fishing vessel and a carrier vessel, either at sea or while in port. Regulatory control and monitoring of transshipment are currently inadequate, especially when it occurs at sea. These gaps create opportunities for illicit activities, such as misreporting or non-reporting of catches, and also foster conditions that are conducive to trafficking in weapons, drugs, and people.

Contact us

Contact research@globalfishingwatch.org for annex data or further questions on this work.